10.03.18

After Secretary DeVos Forced to Delay Attacks on Student Protections, Senator Murray Vows to “Keep Fighting to Stop the Department In Its Tracks”

Department’s final rules to deny debt relief and roll back protections against predatory career training programs will not be published by crucial November 1st deadline

 

Failure to meet the deadline follows outpouring of comments to the Department and widespread opposition from students and families to proposed changes

 

Missing the deadline means no final rule on “borrower defense” or “gainful employment” can go into effect before July 1, 2020—a year later than if the deadline had been met

 

Murray: “While this delay is an important victory for students and borrowers across the country, I know it’s not enough to stall Secretary DeVos’ attacks on student protections, and I am going to keep fighting to stop the Department in its tracks.”

 

Washington, D.C. – Today U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), Ranking Member of the Senate Health Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee, issued the following statement in response to news that the Department of Education will not be publishing a final rule on Borrower Defense or Gainful Employment before November 1, 2018:  

 

“I’m glad the outpouring of opposition from students and families across the country has prevented Secretary DeVos and President Trump from ramming through their harmful plans to deny debt relief for cheated student loan borrowers and roll back student protections against predatory career training programs—but we aren’t done fighting yet. While this delay is an important victory for students and borrowers across the country, I know it’s not enough to stall Secretary DeVos’ attacks on student protections, and I am going to keep fighting to stop the Department in its tracks.”

 

Had the Department published a final rule on Borrower Defense or Gainful Employment before the November 1st deadline, the rules would have gone into effect on July 1, 2019. However, missing the deadline will delay that effective date by at least a full year—meaning the earliest date these rules could go into effect will be July 1, 2020.

 

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